wanderlust.exe

This is what I have always believed: We are all artists, and we have had this glorious capacity to create and to shape the world. Man looked around and could not fathom this place on which he had found himself, and so he named things, shaped things, began to understand limits and boundaries and goals. No one grows until a limit has been placed and a goal to move beyond it is allowed. It was not enough to know that things had names: We had to know if there were purposes to things, meanings, and so we created God, a Higher Power, rituals, appeasements. This gave our lives, our hearts, our communities a series of patterns, rhythms, needs. Out of our worship—which is not only gratitude, but which is also supplication and pain and confusion—we learned to sing and to dance and to craft words that would please our God, our higher angels, our fellow worshipers, our own sense of purpose. I do believe in the priesthood of all believers, and I do believe in the worth and the valor of all artists, and we are all artists. There is clearly a hierarchy, and one does not confuse the brilliant child whose work hangs on the refrigerator with Picasso, but you praise the child and you allow the child to grow from that first effort. From every effort comes growth, and every effort is some form of worship. This I believe. To be a good citizen is a form of art. To be a good friend is a form of art. There is artistry in doing well whatever it is you are needed or forced or delighted to do. In my worst forms of penury, I was a glorious artist at whatever I needed to do to have a little food and a room and some shoes. I was grateful to live and to work and to grow. We have to be ruthless in our standards, and we have to adhere to what it is we want and demand, but we must be utterly open and democratic in understanding that everyone is working out some artistic plan, that everyone desires and deserves a means of expression, and all of us are on someone else’s list of lower orders. Martha Graham in an interview conducted July, 1990

You’re on your knees? … Good. Now die to yourself, to your idea of yourself. Everything you think you think you are. You’re not. What’s left? Find out. G. J.

(Source: lagniappesforyou)

zubrowkafilmcommission:

A Sprawling Manor

Ralph Feinnes and Tony Revolori traverse the expanse of the Desgoffe und Taxis family mansion led by Lea Seydoux as housemaid Clotilde.  Tours of the historical building remained suspended during shooting, allowing the cast and crew to freely explore the maze-like layout of this national landmark.  

I always surprise myself on my ability to turn a phrase. Words are, in my not so humble opinion, the most inexhaustible source of magic; capable of both inflicting injury and remedying it. J. K. Rowling (via victoriousvocabulary)

seeth-ing:

spectacularuniverse:

I’ve seen this photograph very frequently on tumblr and Facebook, always with the simple caption, “Ghost Heart”. What exactly is a ghost heart?
More than 3,200 people are on the waiting list for a heart transplant in the United States. Some won’t survive the wait. Last year, 340 died before a new heart was found.The solution: Take a pig heart, soak it in an ingredient commonly found in shampoo and wash away the cells until you’re left with a protein scaffold that is to a heart what two-by-four framing is to a house.Then inject that ghost heart, as it’s called, with hundreds of millions of blood or bone-marrow stem cells from a person who needs a heart transplant, place it in a bioreactor - a box with artificial lungs and tubes that pump oxygen and blood into it - and wait as the ghost heart begins to mature into a new, beating human heart.Doris Taylor, director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has been working on this— first using rat hearts, then pig hearts and human hearts - for years.The process is called decellularization and it is a tissue engineering technique designed to strip out the cells from a donor organ, leaving nothing but connective tissue that used to hold the cells in place. This scaffold of connective tissue - called a “ghost organ” for its pale and almost translucent appearance - can then be reseeded with a patient’s own cells, with the goal of regenerating an organ that can be transplanted into the patient without fear of tissue rejection.This ghost heart is ready to be injected with a transplant recipient’s stem cells so a new heart - one that won’t be rejected - can be grown.(Source)

Science is so amazing !!!

seeth-ing:

spectacularuniverse:

I’ve seen this photograph very frequently on tumblr and Facebook, always with the simple caption, “Ghost Heart”. What exactly is a ghost heart?

More than 3,200 people are on the waiting list for a heart transplant in the United States. Some won’t survive the wait. Last year, 340 died before a new heart was found.

The solution: Take a pig heart, soak it in an ingredient commonly found in shampoo and wash away the cells until you’re left with a protein scaffold that is to a heart what two-by-four framing is to a house.

Then inject that ghost heart, as it’s called, with hundreds of millions of blood or bone-marrow stem cells from a person who needs a heart transplant, place it in a bioreactor - a box with artificial lungs and tubes that pump oxygen and blood into it - and wait as the ghost heart begins to mature into a new, beating human heart.

Doris Taylor, director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has been working on this— first using rat hearts, then pig hearts and human hearts - for years.

The process is called decellularization and it is a tissue engineering technique designed to strip out the cells from a donor organ, leaving nothing but connective tissue that used to hold the cells in place. 

This scaffold of connective tissue - called a “ghost organ” for its pale and almost translucent appearance - can then be reseeded with a patient’s own cells, with the goal of regenerating an organ that can be transplanted into the patient without fear of tissue rejection.

This ghost heart is ready to be injected with a transplant recipient’s stem cells so a new heart - one that won’t be rejected - can be grown.


(Source)

Science is so amazing !!!

(via k4n43)