wanderlust.exe

The hermit doesn’t sleep at night:
In love with the blue of the vacant moon.
The cool of the breeze
That rustles the trees
Rustles him too.
Ching An  (via mirroir)

(Source: abiding-in-peace, via vorror)


Peep Show or Endless Love Show, Yayoi Kusama, 1966. The mirrors and lights create a world separated from our reality, they allow the viewer to experience some of the visuals Kusama encounters in her hallucinations. The self is obliterated and the mirrored walls and ceilings create a disorienting effect in which everything is endlessly multiplied and you can only know which way is up or down due to the gravity that keeps a person standing on the ground. 

Peep Show or Endless Love Show, Yayoi Kusama, 1966. The mirrors and lights create a world separated from our reality, they allow the viewer to experience some of the visuals Kusama encounters in her hallucinations. The self is obliterated and the mirrored walls and ceilings create a disorienting effect in which everything is endlessly multiplied and you can only know which way is up or down due to the gravity that keeps a person standing on the ground. 

(Source: crystallizations, via hatefulbug)



from my rotten body flowers will grow

and I am in them, and that is eternity

merely a reshuffling of atoms, nothing more

from my rotten body flowers will grow

and I am in them, and that is eternity

merely a reshuffling of atoms, nothing more

(Source: la-anatom-a-de-infierno, via littlemoons)

reallyperfectlynormal:

Just the Victorians Doing What They Do Best- Being Super Fun and Creepy

I stumbled across hidden mothers in Victorian portraits on Google images today. As you may know, taking photographs in the 19th century was no quick task- subjects would have to pose for over a half-hour at times. In order to hold their children still for posing, Victorian mothers would sometimes disguise themselves  as chairs or curtains and sit covered with their kids in the photograph…totally not weird. And where it gets even cooler- hidden mothers are found in plenty of post-mortem photographs with their deceased infants to prop them up to make them look as if they are alive. Pretty fun, right?


Grit Kallin-Fischer, Pieces of Pottery and ceramics | Töpferarbeiten und Keramikwaren, 1930. Germany. Gelatin-silver print. Via LACMA

Grit Kallin-Fischer, Pieces of Pottery and ceramics | Töpferarbeiten und Keramikwaren, 1930. Germany. Gelatin-silver print. Via LACMA

(via design-is-fine)

There is nothing as mysterious as a fact clearly described. We can recognize and name what has been described but not what just happened, not what is going on, not what is about to happen. Once you accept the idea that all photographs are fictions, analogies for the things they represent, then you are more receptive to the meaning that is being suggested by that analogy, by that fiction. To be more specific, photographs are about something that would not exist without the photograph. Henry Wessel

From An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe, published by astronomer Thomas Wright in 1750. Wright correctly hypothesized that the Milky Way was a flat plane of stars of which our sun was a part, but he also theorized a spherical galaxy (top), also shown in cross-section (bottom). He had come a long way from the assumption that the Earth was the center of the Universe, dogma less than a hundred years earlier, to an understanding of our planet’s insignificance from an astronomical perspective:

"In this great Celestial Creation, the Catastrophy of a World, such as ours, or even the total Dissolution of a System of Worlds, may possibly be no more to the great Author of Nature, than the most common Accident in Life with us, and in all probability such final and general DoomsDays may be as frequent there, as even Birth-Days or Mortality with us upon this Earth."

(Source: ufansius)